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Main Street Winchester encourages Kentuckians to shop local during the holidays

By Winchester Sun

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Published 10:09 am Tuesday, December 1, 2020

Main Street Winchester is partnering with the Kentucky Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet and Kentucky Main Street Program for a special holiday promotion highlighting small businesses in Main Street communities across the commonwealth.

Kentucky Main Street works to encourage downtown revitalization and economic development through preserving historic buildings.

KYMS features 29 participating local programs that support restaurants, art spaces and retail unique to Kentucky, including Main Street Winchester.

During December, individual Main Street communities are being highlighted on social media (@KyTAHC) using the hashtags #ExploreKyMainSt and #ShopKyMainSt.

“The holidays are going to look and feel different for everyone, but small businesses throughout Kentucky are taking the necessary precautions to ensure Kentuckians can safely shop this holiday season,” Tourism, Arts and Heritage Cabinet Secretary Mike Berry said. “Supporting local is more important than ever. We encourage people to take advantage of local holiday shopping to see firsthand the unique finds created by Kentucky artisans, and help keep dollars spent locally circulating within the community.”

Main Street Winchester has introduced a variety of creative promotions and other activities geared to maintain safety in light of the pandemic, such as  an Online Parklet Concert Series promoting native Winchester artists, the Walk Through Winchester Video Series, which highlights downtown businesses and their adapting to current times, and promoting downtown businesses social media pages as much as possible.

“We invite shoppers to also use these hashtags to share your Main Street experiences with us on social media,” KYMS State Coordinator Kitty Dougoud said. “These unique historic downtowns are ready for you to explore during the holiday season – in person, using curbside pick-up, and online. It’s a wonderful opportunity to create memories while supporting local businesses.”

Because of the continued escalation of COVID-19 cases throughout the commonwealth, Kentuckians are encouraged to take advantage of online shopping. Kentuckians who choose to shop Kentucky Main Streets through safe in-person shopping should follow the Red Zone Reduction Recommendations.

For more about Main Street Winchester, visit DowntownWinchesterKY.org.

How to make a Country Ham for Christmas

November 30, 2020

Christmas Past. Christmas Present.
BY TOM YATES

No doubt, it’s been a heck of a year. After months of masking up, being apart, and staying socially distant, we’ve missed birthdays, anniversaries, funerals, weddings, holidays, and much much more. And now, it’s coming on Christmas. Different and distant.

In our new normal, Christmas won’t be like Christmases past. Even so, we can wear those past memories like warm tattered sweaters, live in the present, and look to the future. 

As we navigate change during the holiday season, embrace joy and hope. Hold onto the good things. Hold fast to small indulgences. Go ahead, pull out the good china, polish some silver, glaze a fatty ham, roast a Christmas goose, or simply order take out. Whatever it takes, indulge just a little, and embrace Christmas present. 

Around here, we’ll be scaling back and dialing things down. Simple is good. We have time. 

Agood Christmas ham starts with a great ham. Browning’s Country Ham, from Dry Ridge, cures and ages their hams for 12 months. Both mild and robust, it’s one of the go-to hams around these parts. 

Although I was forewarned to expect mold, it got the best of me. When I ripped open the butcher paper surrounding the ham, plumes of green-ashen powdered mold exploded from the package. Caught by the rays of the morning sun, the dust cloud dangled in the light for what seemed like an eternity. After a quick wipe down and clean up, I scrubbed the ham under warm water with a sturdy brush to remove the mold. Luckily, I had an enormous canning pot large enough to accommodate the ham. After plopping it into the pot, I filled it with enough water to cover the ham, maneuvered the lid over the protruding bone (most folks remove the hock), and scooted the ham into a corner of the kitchen to soak for two days, changing the water every 12 hours.

On the third day, I drained off the water and lifted the pot containing the plumped ham onto the stove top. After filling it with cold water, I topped it off with 6 bottles of Ale-8-One soda and a cup of pure maple syrup before cranking the heat to high. When the sweet gingery water came to a boil, I reduced it to a gentle simmer, covered the pot, and let it rip for 5 1/2 hours, about 25 minutes per pound.

When the internal temperature reached 160 degrees, I carefully removed the pot from the heat before wrapping the entire pot with several old quilts to let the ham slowly steep in its own juices overnight. Yep. Overnight. Pig in a blanket. 

The next morning, I carefully removed the ham to a roasting pan and discarded the cooking liquid along a fence row in our backyard. Still hot from the quilted insulation, I removed the skin from the ham and trimmed some off some of the fat.

I lightly scored the soft fat cap on top of the ham, splashed the meat with bourbon, slathered the entire surface with good dijon mustard, and encrusted it with a thin layer of light brown sugar before sliding it into a preheated 400 degree oven.

When the brown sugar dissolved into the mustard and started to caramelize, I pulled the ham from the over to rest. At that stage, it could have been wrapped and chilled. Didn’t happen.  After letting it rest for 30 minutes, I transferred the ham to a serving platter, scattered a few quartered Red Bartlett pears to the side, and finished with fresh lovage from my garden.

____

This article also appears on page 18 of the December 2020 print edition of ace magazine

Kentucky breweries working with local farms to create Kentucky Proud Beer

By Alex King -October 26, 2020

LEXINGTON, Ky. (WTVQ) – This year’s Kentucky Proud Beer Series begins Wednesday, the focus is creating Kentucky Proud Beer with Kentucky agriculture.

“Just, you know, seeing your product go into beer and bourbon.”

The beer series is a staple of Kentucky’s fall calendar.

Many of the breweries are using Kentucky malt made from locally grown grains, produced by South Fork Malthouse in Cynthiana.

RT Case is the malthouse owner, he says the series is a chance for brewers and farmers to work together and create new flavors.

“It’s kind of like a small nit community. Once you kind of get in the group, you’re pretty good to go. They’ve been super supportive and I know a lot of customers have been really seeking out local ingredients in their beer and bourbon so I think the timing just worked out perfectly,” Case said.

Ethereal Brewing and Country Boy Brewing in Central Kentucky are just two of the breweries he’s worked with for this series.

These beers include everything from grains and hops to berries.

Last year, Fusion Brewing in Lexington used grapes.

This year it wanted to do something different and went with local and fresh, right from the vine.

“It’s a german helles lager and if you ask me it tastes great. It’s semi malty but very light in color, it’s golden, it’s beautiful,” Co-Owner and head brewer Christian Paumi says.

The beer is now on tap for customers.

Brewers participating in the 2020 Kentucky Proud Beer Series include:

• 3rd Turn Brewing, in Louisville and Crestwood;
• Abettor Brewing Company, Winchester;
• Alexandria Brewing Company;
• Broken Throne Brewing, Pikeville;
• Country Boy Brewing, both Lexington and Georgetown locations;
• Dreaming Creek Brewery, Richmond;
• Dry Ground Brewing, Paducah;
• Ethereal Brewing, Lexington;
• Flywheel Brewing, Elizabethtown;
• Fusion Brewing, Lexington;
• Gallant Fox Brewing, Louisville;
• Goodwood Brewing, both Louisville and Frankfort locations;
• Gravely Brewing Co., Louisville;
• Hopkinsville Brewing;
• Maysville Brewing;
• Monnik Beer Co., Louisville;
• Old Louisville Brewing, both Louisville and Shelbyville locations;
• Paducah Beer Werks;
• Pivot Brewing, Lexington;
• Ten20 Beer Exchange, Louisville;
• Turtleback Ridge Brewing, Ewing;
• Uncrafted Territory Brewing Co., Beaver Dam;
• West Sixth Brewing’s Lexington, Frankfort and Louisville locations;
• Wise Bird Cider, Lexington; and
• Wooden Cask Brewing Company, Newport.

How to Throw the Ultimate Breeders’ Cup Watch Party

EVENTS / TRAVELOctober 23rd, 2020

BY Penelope Miller

This year’s Breeders’ Cup at Keeneland Race Course will be unlike any other: in addition to offering world-class racing, it’s going to be an at-home affair for all racing fans this year due to the ongoing pandemic. That means that you have a chance to get really creative with your Breeders’ Cup viewing party, whether it’s held over Zoom or with a socially-distanced get-together in the back yard. Need a little inspiration? We’re here to help!

The DécorKeeneland’s gift shop. (Coady Photography)

Purple and gold are the official colors of the Breeders’ Cup, and forest green is Keeneland’s signature hue; that provides a nice jumping off point for your decorating needs. First off, consider the Breeders’ Cup shop as a one-stop place for your party needs. From mugs to rocks glasses and more, the collection is a great way to show your BC pride in the Bluegrass.  Another great option is the Keeneland shop; it’s one of the great racetrack gift shops I’ve ever encountered, and they have a huge selection of home goods that will serve your racing viewing party needs for years to come.

Looking for something a little less permanent? These racing-themed paper plates and napkins are perfect for a Breeders’ Cup party. I’m also very partial to these jockey silks cocktail napkins, as well as these Thoroughbred popcorn holdersThese plastic julep cups will be perfect for housing the bourbon cocktail of your choice, and a racehorse pennant banner is the ultimate Zoom party backdrop.

The FoodKeeneland’s burgoo. (ABR Photo)

Keeneland has some food that’s not only legendary in racing circles, it’s pretty easy to recreate at home, too! Here are some ideas inspired by the tracks’ beloved offerings, plus a few others that I think would work nicely for your viewing party.

Keeneland Burgoo

A hearty stew that’s perfect for fall, burgoo is deceptively easy to make despite its lengthy ingredients list. Kathy Miller Time has a great copycat recipe based on Keeneland’s classic.

Mini hot brown tarts

While the hot brown originated in Louisville, not Lexington, it’s still a quintessentially Kentucky food. Spicy Southern Kitchen helps you make the iconic sandwiches party-ready by switching the bread for mini tart shells for ultimate snackability.

Benedictine Dip

The Spruce Eats is here with a great recipe for this easy and delicious traditional Kentucky dip that’s perfect for a party.

Beer cheese

The first time I tried beer cheese, I was holed up at a dive bar in a small Kentucky town called Millville. When it was offered, I figured I’d try it because it would be so gross as to make a great story. Was I ever wrong: tangy and rich, it’s a great snack and perfect for watching races on TV. Let Smitten Kitchen be your guide to making this instantly addictive dip. 

Keeneland bread pudding

This is a stick-to-your-ribs dessert (and the bourbon sauce will possibly make you tipsy!) and it’s so, so good. I can see breaking this recipe from Food.com up into a cupcake pan to bake and making personal servings for a viewing party! Just don’t with the strawberries if you want to stick to the Keeneland recipe.

Bourbon Balls

Want your dessert and your digestif combined into bite-size form? Enter the bourbon ball, a delightful treat that’s heavy on both the booze and sugar. Check out Tasting Table for an easy recipe that packs a bourbon-y punch.

Oatmeal cookies, but more complicated than this actual recipe because I’m difficult that way

I love oatmeal cookies, and I feel like they’re perfect for watching horse races because they have strong sweet feed energy. I love this recipe from Kitchn, but over the years I’ve tweaked it a little bit. Before we get to those changes, an important note: when the recipe tells you to pre-toast the oatmeal: do it. It adds so much dimension to the cookies, and you’ll be glad you did. Now the tweaks: instead of softened butter, brown your butter and let it solidify back to room temperature; it’s a big extra step and it takes a long time, but the flavor you get from this is indescribably good. Pro tip: when you’re transferring your butter from the saucepan to cool, put it in a Pyrex measuring cup and add more butter to it until you get back to a full cup. A lot of water evaporates through the browning process. Finally, the recipe calls for raisins. They are the devil’s candy and are to be avoided at all costs; replace with dried cranberries and chopped chocolate and you’re in for a good time.

The CocktailsMaker’s Mark bourbon. (Eclipse Sportswire)

Bourbon is going to be your go-to here; after all, the only true bourbon comes out of Kentucky, so you’ll be supporting Lexington-area businesses as you imbibe! The official bourbon of the Breeders’ Cup is Maker’s Mark, and they even have a cool commemorative bottle just in time for the world championships. Here are a few cocktail recipes to check out for your Breeders’ Cup watch party:

The Torrie Cup

One of the official cocktails of the Breeders’ Cup, the Torrie Cup is a mix of bourbon, sweet vermouth, orange juice, and lemonade. It’s the perfect mix of refreshing and potent!

Maple Old Fashioned

The perfect meld of fall flavors and Kentucky bourbon, the maple old fashioned puts an autumnal twist on a classic cocktail.

Hot Toddy

If you’re having people over and staying safe outside, consider a hot toddy for a warming cocktail. They’re delicious, warming, and right on-theme for the Breeders’ Cup.

Ale 8 One

Provide for the non-drinkers, designated drivers, and kids with some Ale 8 One, the official soft drink of the Bluegrass State. It’s a soda conceived of and wildly popular in Kentucky, and it’s kind of like if a ginger ale and a Sprite had a baby. Which is to say: it’s really good! (Also, you can mix it with your bourbon if you so choose. That’s good, too!)

West Sixth Brewing Company

My friend and colleague Greg recommends the offerings from this Lexington-based microbrewery; it can be hard to find outside of Kentucky and Ohio, but I have intel that’s spied it as far as Chicago. If you can get your hands on some of this very tasty brew, be sure to have it for your viewing party for the authentic Lexington experience.

State’s tribute to craft beer drinkers almost here

By Steve Rogers -October 19, 2020

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ) – Kentucky’s annual fall dream for beer drinkers is almost here.

Crafting Kentucky Proud beers with Kentucky agricultural products is the focus of this year’s Kentucky Proud Beer Series, Agriculture Commissioner Dr. Ryan Quarles has announced.

Now in its fifth year, the beer series combines the best of what Kentucky has to offer from its breweries with its farms.

“Every October, Kentucky’s craft brewers use locally grown products to brew one-of-a-kind beers to showcase their creativity and honor the Commonwealth’s producers,” Commissioner Quarles said. “We are pleased to collaborate with the Kentucky Guild of Brewers once again on what has become a staple of Kentucky’s fall calendar.”

“This is my favorite beer series that we do every year,” said Derek Selznick, executive director of the Kentucky Guild of Brewers. “This series is a chance for our brewers to get together with our farmers to put their creative minds together to make beers that truly capture the essence of Kentucky. From grains and hops to every berry under the sun, these beers are totally unique and Kentucky Proud.”

Participating Kentucky craft brewers will release special beers infused with Kentucky Proud ingredients on Oct. 28.

The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) worked with the Guild to match craft brewers with Kentucky Proud producers to create the limited-release beers. Everything from lavender extract, honey, molasses, carrots, apples, blueberries, and pumpkin will be infused into these unique beers for that special fall flavor for the fifth annual series.

And for the first time in series history, many of the breweries are using Kentucky malt made from locally grown grains this year, produced by South Fork Malthouse out of Cynthiana.

Local breweries will release their Kentucky Proud brews to the public starting on Oct. 28. Each participating brewery will give away commemorative Kentucky Proud and Kentucky Guild of Brewers branded pint glasses and event posters to the first 100 customers purchasing its limited release Kentucky Proud beer.

Brewers participating in the 2020 Kentucky Proud Beer Series include:

·     3rd Turn Brewing, in Louisville and Crestwood;

·     Abettor Brewing Company, Winchester;

·     Alexandria Brewing Company;

·     Broken Throne Brewing, Pikeville;

·     Country Boy Brewing, both Lexington and Georgetown locations;

·     Dreaming Creek Brewery, Richmond;

·     Dry Ground Brewing, Paducah;

·     Ethereal Brewing, Lexington;

·     Flywheel Brewing, Elizabethtown;

·     Fusion Brewing, Lexington;

·     Gallant Fox Brewing, Louisville;

·     Goodwood Brewing, both Louisville and Frankfort locations;

·     Gravely Brewing Co., Louisville;

·     Hopkinsville Brewing;

·     Maysville Brewing;

·     Monnik Beer Co., Louisville;

·     Old Louisville Brewing, both Louisville and Shelbyville locations;

·     Paducah Beer Werks;

·     Pivot Brewing, Lexington;

·     Ten20 Beer Exchange, Louisville;

·     Turtleback Ridge Brewing, Ewing;

·     Uncrafted Territory Brewing Co., Beaver Dam;

·     West Sixth Brewing’s Lexington, Frankfort and Louisville locations;

·     Wise Bird Cider, Lexington; and

·     Wooden Cask Brewing Company, Newport.

For information about the 2020 Kentucky Proud Beer Series and Festival, go to kygbrewers.org

Kentucky crafted beers infused with Kentucky Proud products on tap for Oct. 28 release in annual series

Oct 21st, 2020

Crafting Kentucky Proud beers with Kentucky agricultural products is the focus of this year’s Kentucky Proud Beer Series, Agriculture Commissioner Ryan Quarles has announced. Now in its fifth year, the beer series combines the best of what Kentucky has to offer from its breweries with its farms.

“Every October, Kentucky’s craft brewers use locally grown products to brew one-of-a-kind beers to showcase their creativity and honor the Commonwealth’s producers,” Quarles said. “We are pleased to collaborate with the Kentucky Guild of Brewers once again on what has become a staple of Kentucky’s fall calendar.”

“This is my favorite beer series that we do every year,” said Derek Selznick, executive director of the Kentucky Guild of Brewers. “This series is a chance for our brewers to get together with our farmers to put their creative minds together to make beers that truly capture the essence of Kentucky. From grains and hops to every berry under the sun, these beers are totally unique and Kentucky Proud.”

Participating Kentucky craft brewers will release special beers infused with Kentucky Proud ingredients on Oct. 28. The Kentucky Department of Agriculture (KDA) worked with the Guild to match craft brewers with Kentucky Proud producers to create the limited-release beers. Everything from lavender extract, honey, molasses, carrots, apples, blueberries, and pumpkin will be infused into these unique beers for that special fall flavor for the fifth annual series. And for the first time in series history, many of the breweries are using Kentucky malt made from locally grown grains this year, produced by South Fork Malthouse out of Cynthiana.

Local breweries will release their Kentucky Proud brews to the public starting on Oct. 28. Each participating brewery will give away commemorative Kentucky Proud and Kentucky Guild of Brewers branded pint glasses and event posters to the first 100 customers purchasing its limited release Kentucky Proud beer.

Brewers participating in the 2020 Kentucky Proud Beer Series include:

• 3rd Turn Brewing, in Louisville and Crestwood;
• Abettor Brewing Company, Winchester;
• Alexandria Brewing Company;
• Broken Throne Brewing, Pikeville;
• Country Boy Brewing, both Lexington and Georgetown locations;
• Dreaming Creek Brewery, Richmond;
• Dry Ground Brewing, Paducah;
• Ethereal Brewing, Lexington;
• Flywheel Brewing, Elizabethtown;
• Fusion Brewing, Lexington;
• Gallant Fox Brewing, Louisville;
• Goodwood Brewing, both Louisville and Frankfort locations;
• Gravely Brewing Co., Louisville;
• Hopkinsville Brewing;
• Maysville Brewing;
• Monnik Beer Co., Louisville;
• Old Louisville Brewing, both Louisville and Shelbyville locations;
• Paducah Beer Werks;
• Pivot Brewing, Lexington;
• Ten20 Beer Exchange, Louisville;
• Turtleback Ridge Brewing, Ewing;
• Uncrafted Territory Brewing Co., Beaver Dam;
• West Sixth Brewing’s Lexington, Frankfort and Louisville locations;
• Wise Bird Cider, Lexington; and
• Wooden Cask Brewing Company, Newport.

For more information about the 2020 Kentucky Proud Beer Series and Festival, go to kygbrewers.org.

Kentucky Department of Agriculture

Celebrating Halloween at home this year? Good. Now whip up one of these ghoulish beverages

Kirby AdamsLouisville Courier Journal

As Halloween approaches, you may be asking if it’s safe to celebrate the holiday in the traditional way or if you should be finding alternatives to toast the spooky season.

Due to the coronavirus pandemic, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention announced that most traditional Halloween activities, such as costume parties and door-to-door trick-or-treating, are considered high risk. But we can still celebrate Halloween safely while socializing with a few of our quarantine friends. 

The founder of the Louisville-based The Mocktail Project, Jesse Hawkins, has whipped up a couple of nonalcoholic concoctions to enjoy safely at home. Plus we gathered up a few other non and alcoholic favorites from local mixologists perfect for the fall. 

So drink these ghoulish brews from the safety of your home to capture the “spirit” of Halloween.

Kentucky Gingered Pumpkin Ale 

1 serving. Source: Jesse Hawkins, The Mocktail Project

  • 1 and- ½-ounces REAL Mixers Pumpkin Reàl 
  • 1 ounce REAL Mixers Orgeat 
  • 1/2 ounce  fresh-squeezed lemon juice 
  • 4 ounces Original Ale-8-One
  • Garnish with a lemon wedge 

Combine the first three ingredients in a shaker with light ice. Shake and pour over ice into serving glass, add Ale-8-One and stir. Garnish with a lemon wedge.

To read the entire artilcle click here!

McCANN: Creativity in Quarantine — Welcome Leeds’ new zine

By Winchester Sun

Published 3:52 pm Thursday, October 8, 2020

On Sept. 25, the Leeds Center for the Arts and editor Rebecca Campomanes digitally released volume 1, issue 1 of its new zine, CiQ online.

The zine (short for magazine) is an online-only literary journal that will be published every two weeks; the second issue was published today.

People from across the nation and locally may submit their art, poems, essays, photos, stories, recipes, doodles and ramblings for possible inclusion in a future “zine.”

According to Campomanes, “The first issue is free to access online. The current and future issues will be accessible for $1.”

Issues will release every two weeks “until the creativity runs out.”

Any form of creativity will be considered. To submit or if you have questions, comments or concerns contact [email protected]

Following is a brief email interview with Campomanes about the zine and her vision for it.

In a few instances her answers have been edited for brevity or clarity.

Click here to read the entire article and interview.

The most famous local dish from every state

Erin McDowell Oct 2, 2020, 2:35 PM

KENTUCKY: Beer cheese

According to local lore, beer cheese was invented by Chef Joe Allman for his cousin Johnnie, the owner of the Driftwood Inn near Winchester, Kentucky. According to the Downtown Winchester Beer Cheese Festival, the dish was originally created by Allman to entice customers to order more beer with their meals.

To read the entire article click here!

Kentucky Derby 2020: At Home Celebrations

August 28, 2020

JC Phelps, II

Hey, y’all! The Kentucky Derby is my favorite holiday — and always will be. While this is a nontraditional racing year and fans are not allowed at the track, my shine won’t be dulled: I’m celebrating Kentucky Derby 2020 at home with Ale-8-One!

The Kentucky Derby at Churchill Downs – and, really, the entire week of – is the finest showing of sweet, southern, Kentucky culture. While it won’t be the same, I do think that these tips and recipes will help make this year one to remember for you and your loved ones!

Party Preparation

There are many facets of a successful Kentucky Derby party. However, there are a few things that need to be considered: the outfit (hats!), the decor (all things equestrian! oh, and roses!), the menu, and the cocktails (Ale-8 is the perfect mixer!).

My favorite tip? Serve all drinks in vintage (and current year) Derby glasses. I pick mine up throughout the year at yard sales, Goodwills, and thrift stores. They certainly bring the southern charm factor!

Tell me: do you prefer traditional hats or fascinators? I’m curious!

I purchase most all of my party needs each year at my local Kroger. They are a true one-stop shop for all things Derby. The best part? You can even pick up your Ale-8-One there. Be sure to look out for the limited-edition, commemorative Derby packaging on the shelves. I look forward to it each and every year!

Kentucky Derby 2020: At Home Celebrations Guide

Kentucky Derby Party Menu: Food

The most important part of a successful Kentucky Derby party? The food.

Kick things off with my pimento cheese – which I appropriately call “Better Than MeeMaw’s Pimento Cheese”, as it’s lip-smackin’ good.

Read the entire artcile here!

‘Winchester’s living room’ revamps, reopens with new owners, new pizzas, same comfort

BY BLAKE HANNON CONTRIBUTING WRITERAUGUST 27, 2020 06:00 AM

Chad T. Walker and his wife, Jill, have a combination of affection and memories tied up in their new downtown Winchester dining spot, The Engine House Pub and Pizza Parlour.

Jill worked at the location as a server in high school and college. And being the site of Winchester’s longest-running restaurant, the 135-year-old property and former firehouse has a special place in each of their hearts.

When the couple purchased the property in Jan. 2020, they found out other people felt the same way.

“People are coming in saying, ‘when I was 12 years old and I ate in that back booth,’” Chad said. “It’s funny how many people come in. It’s like a ‘Field of Dreams’ scenario.”

When the Walkers think back, they remember the restaurant most fondly when it was the Engine House Deli, owned by Bob Tabor. The restaurant has been through several owners and incarnations in its history as a go-to eating spot, eventually switching to pizza but never switching off its charm with diners.

“It was kind of a passion project and we didn’t want to see it torn down or turned into a law firm or something,” said Chad, who also works in real estate with his wife.

To read the full article ckick below:

https://www.kentucky.com/lexgoeat/restaurants/article244709442.html?

More than a mint julep. You’ll definitely want to try these at-home Kentucky Derby recipes

Kirby AdamsLouisville Courier Journal

The 146th Kentucky Derby will be one like no other. With the Churchill Downs announcement that it’s shutting down the infield and limiting fans to less than 23,000, the majority of people will be watching the (delayed) Run for the Roses from the safety of their homes on Saturday, Sept. 5.

That means 2020 will be the year of the at-home Kentucky Derby party. If you’re looking for inspiration, Louisville entertaining mavens Peggy Noe Stevens and Susan Reigler have written a book filled with entertaining ideas and recipes called “Which Fork Do I Use With My Bourbon?” (Find it locally at Carmichael’s Bookstore for $30).

It includes traditional Southern cocktails and appetizers that will take your 2020 Kentucky Derby party up a notch, from nontraditional mint juleps to everything from Kentucky classic Benedictine to cheese grits and corn pudding. (Plus, try the bonus recipe below from Kentucky’s own Ale-8-One.)

Be sure if you are hosting a small at-home Kentucky Derby party that you’re observing any restrictions put in place by Kentucky Gov. Andy Beshear, that you and your guests are observing safe social distancing and above all, don’t forget your mask.

Happy Derby, everyone. 

Traditional mint julep

The traditional drink of the Kentucky Derby, the Mint Julep, is a must at any home Derby party.

1 serving

  • 1-ounce simple syrup
  • 3 to 5 fresh mint leaves plus a fresh sprig for garnish
  • 3-ounces Kentucky bourbon
  • Crushed ice

To make the simple syrup, add 2 cups of granulated sugar to 1 cup of boiling water. Cool, bottle and refrigerate. You can do this the day before the party.

To make the julep, place the simple syrup and mint leaves in the bottom of a julep cup or glass. Muddle. Add bourbon and stir.

Fill to the brim with crushed ice, add a long straw and garnish with a mint spring. 

Note: if you are using mint-infused bourbon, don’t use the muddled mint leaves. 

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Mint julep variations

Peggy Noe Stevens suggests mixing bathes of the cocktails you will serve at your Kentucky Derby party ahead of time. During the COVID-19 outbreak this is especially important because it helps to keep guests from touching multiple bottles if they were to make their own drinks.

Spice up your traditional mint julep offerings with these four unique twists on the classic cocktail: 

Pineapple Julep: Muddle a tablespoon of chopped fresh pineapple with mint leaves and use 2-ounces of bourbon and 1-ounce of pineapple juice.

Strawberry Julep: Add 3 fresh chopped strawberries to the bottom of the glass along with the mint and syrup and muddle.

Chocolate Julep: No muddling needed here. Simply combine 2-ounces Kentucky bourbon, 1-ounce white crème de menthe, and 1-ounce dark crème de cacao; shake over ice, and pour into a stemmed cocktail glass. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Peach-Basil Julep: Use fresh basil leaves and a split vanilla bean to make the simple syrup. Add two 5 ½-ounce cans of peach nectar to the syrup. Muddle a peach slice instead of mint.

Dark and Bloody Bourbon Mary

The Bloody Mary cocktail is an afternoon tradition on Derby day. A nice drink to break up an afternoon of Mint Juleps.

1 serving

  • 1 teaspoon salt, pepper, paprika mix
  • 2-ounces bourbon
  • 2 large lemon wedges
  • 1 tablespoon Worcestershire sauce
  • 1 can (6-ounces) tomato juice

To prepare the seasoning mix, combine in a mortar one part each smoked sea salt, smoked black pepper and smoked paprika. Finely crush with a pestle and shake together in a jar. 

To a pint glass or a large mason jar filled with ice, add the bourbon, squeeze and drop in the lemon wedges and add 1 teaspoon of the seasoning mix and Worcestershire sauce. Shake. Add more ice and the tomato juice. Shake again.

Garnish with a long straw and baby corn, large pitted black olive and cherry pepper, all on a stick. 

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Jubil8

Ale-8 has brought back their horse racing themed packaging for the Kentucky Derby

Ale-8-One has brought back its traditional horse racing themed Kentucky Derby packaging this month. For your themed at-home party, enjoy the Kentucky-born beverage on its own or as a mixer. 

  • 2 teaspoons Ale-8 infused simple syrup
  • 6-8 mint leaves
  • Crushed ice
  • 1.5 ounces bourbon
  • 1 bottle Ale-8

Gently muddle simple syrup and mint leaves in a silver julep cup. Fill the cup with crushed ice. Add bourbon and fill the cup with Ale-8. Garnish with a sprig of mint.

Benedictine

Benedictine spread is a Louisville original.
  • 3 tablespoons cucumber juice 1 tablespoon onion juice
  • 8 ounces cream cheese, softened 1 teaspoon salt
  • A few grains cayenne pepper, 2 drops green food coloring

To obtain the juice, peel and grate a cucumber, wrap it in a clean dish towel, and squeeze the juice into a bowl. Discard the pulp. Do the same with the onion. Mix all the ingredients with a fork until well blended. Do not use a blender; it will make the spread too runny.

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Cheese Grits

Serves 6

  • 1/2 cup stone-ground grits
  • 1/4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons (1/2 stick butter)
  • 1/2 cup shredded sharp cheddar cheese
  • Cayenne pepper to taste
  • 3 eggs separated

Preheat the oven to 375 degrees. In a heavy saucepan, bring 2 ½ cups of salted water to boil and add the grits. 

Simmer over medium heat stirring constantly for about 20 minutes. Stir in the butter and remove from the heat. Add the cheese, cayenne and egg yolks. Cover and set aside.

Beat the egg whites until stiff and stir them into the grits. Pour the mixture into a 1-quart buttered baking dish and back 35-40 minutes until golden brown.

Corn Pudding

Serves 8-10

  • 4 cups fresh corn kernels (about 8 cans)
  • 1/2 cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons flour
  • 1 teaspoon salt
  • 1½ teaspoon baking powder
  • 6 eggs, beaten 
  • 2 cups heavy cream
  • 1 cup half and half
  • 2 tablespoons butter, melted

Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Process 1 cup of corn in a food processor until ground. Combine the ground corn, the remaining 3 cups of corn kernels, sugar, flour, salt and baking powder in a bowl and mix well. Whisk the eggs, heavy cream, and half and half in a bowl until blended and stir into the corn mixture. Add the butter and mix well.

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Pour the mixture into a greased 9-by-13-inch baking pan and bake for 40 minutes, or unit a sharp knife inserted in the center comes out clean. You can substitute frozen corn for fresh.