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Kentucky’s Ale-8-One launches Orange Cream Ale-8-One just in time for the Summer

NEWS PROVIDED BYHGPR Inc.June 08, 2021, 13:00 GMT

WINCHESTER , KENTUCKY, UNITED STATES, /EINPresswire.com/ — The iconic soda brand, Ale-8-One, is bringing back the summer fan favorite, Orange Cream Ale-8-One, while supplies last. This popular seasonal addition to the current Ale-8-One family of products delivers a dreamsicle inspired flavor that evokes a sweet sense of nostalgia, just in time to kick off the Brand’s 95-year anniversary this summer. Orange Cream Ale-8-One made its debut on June 7th in the Bluegrass region along with expanded footprints in, Louisville, Cincinnati, Pikeville, and most of Western Kentucky in Kroger, Walmart, and Meijer retailers.

“The tremendous positive response from our first two summer launches of Orange Cream Ale-8-One has been overwhelming. We are delighted to be able to return this summertime classic to the shelves this year. Consumers had plenty of time last summer to experiment with recipes at home; we are excited for them to share their float and cocktail creations with friends this time around.” – Chris Doyle, Marketing Director for Ale-8-One.

Orange Cream Ale-8-One will be available as a limited edition 4-pack. The small batch seasonal soda is crafted with an all-natural orange and vanilla blend combined with the Ale-8-One secret formula.

About Ale-8-One
Ale-8-One Bottling Company was founded in 1902 by G.L. Wainscott in Winchester, Kentucky, and remains the oldest, privately held bottler in the United States still owned and operated by the founding family. Ale-8-One soft drink has been bottled in green glass in Winchester since 1926. The only soft drink invented in Kentucky still in existence, Ale-8’s proprietary blend is flavored with ginger and citrus and contains less carbonation and fewer calories than conventional sodas. The company’s founder and inventor, G.L. Wainscott, developed the recipe, and to this day, his great-great-nephew, Fielding Rogers, personally blends every batch of Ale-8-One. Ale-8-One is widely available in Kentucky, available nationwide online, available in Kroger stores throughout the Southeast, and can be found at most Cracker Barrel Old Country Stores and Fresh Market. For more information, visit ale8one.com and follow on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

Niki Dec
HGPR Inc
+1 310-850-8870
[email protected]

Rock the Block returns with Beer Cheese Shop

By Dillan Combs

Downtown Winchester will see the return of its Rock the Block concert series Friday, June 11, from 5-9 p.m.
Previously, June’s Rock the Block was accompanied by Winchester’s signature Beer Cheese Festival. Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, the festival had to be postponed. It is slated to return in 2022.
Joining in the event’s stead is the Beer Cheese Shop in the parklet at 19 North Main Street, with vendors selling crafts, farmers market goods, and of course, beer cheese. At 7 p.m., country band The Ranahans will “Rock the Block” at the Main Street courthouse stairs.
The event will also be host to a children’s section, where kids can get with balloon animals and partake in soccer.
Simultaneous to the event is the Remember When Cruiserz Car Show in downtown. Spectators will be able to view vintage cars cruising down Main Street.
Rock the Block is sponsored by Traditional Bank. Entry is free. For more information, visit Winchester Downtown’s Facebook page at https://www.facebook.com/MainStreetWinchesterKY.

Sweet success – Ice cream social raises funds for theater, homeless shelter

By Randy Patrick

Published 4:54 pm Monday, May 24, 2021

Saturday was a good day for ice cream. And art.

During the noon hour, there was a steady stream of people who came by the Leeds Center for the Arts to pick up ceramic bowls they had pre-ordered, along with individual servings of Blue Bell ice cream.

And nearby at Many Friends Park, the tables were filled with friends and families enjoying the ice cream.

The ice cream social and art sale were a fundraiser for the historic community theater and the Clark County Homeless Coalition, which divided the proceeds 50/50.

Tracey Miller, executive director of the Leeds, said 195 tickets had been pre-sold for Mini-Scooped, but there was still time for others to order.

“It’s very exciting to be out and to be able to see everybody,” she said

Miller said she wanted to thank all the volunteers who came out to help and the owners of Dirty South Pottery for making the bowls.

Carvel Norman, who owns Dirty South with his wife Ashley, was demonstrating his pottery skills in front of their studio Saturday across Main Street from the theater.

On their Facebook page, they reporter that they had sold all the bowls they had made for the event and raised $4,200 for “two amazing nonprofits.”

The Leeds Youth Board provided many of the volunteers, First United Methodist Church donated the tables and chairs, and Blue Bell donated all the ice cream, the city allowed use of the parking lot and Dirty South team members stuffed brown paper bags with the bowls and helped coordinate the event.

“It’s amazing the community was so supportive,” Miller said. “My heart is full.”

“It was such a beautiful day, and there is such a great community to come out and support us,” said Terry Davidson, executive director of the Homeless Coalition. “I can’t thank people enough. It never fails to impress me how this community steps up” and comes together to support good causes, she said.

A sip of summer – Orange Cream Ale-8

By Winchester Sun

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Published 4:04 pm Monday, May 17, 2021

Huge Ale-8 fan and Smoke Signals sports editor Sawyer Broeking gets in on a special treat – the first production day of this year’s Orange Cream Ale-8

BY Sawyer Broeking, GRC Smoke Signals Sports Editor


When you think of summer, what is the first thing that comes to mind?

Do you think of hot days and cool nights spent with friends and family?

Or do you think of backyard barbecues filled with laughs and competitive games of cornhole?

What about when you were a kid, how you used to zoom down the street on your bike to get to the ice cream truck?

Well, for me, I think of pulling an ice-cold, refreshing Ale-8 out of the cooler.

There is nothing like that feeling of twisting off the cap and taking that powerful first sip. It doesn’t matter the flavor.

If it has Ale-8-One written across the label, then I’m obsessed.

If it has Ale-8-One written across the label, then I’m obsessed.

For the past two summers Ale-8-One has provided the region with its seasonal orange cream flavor, which is a drink that has summer written all over it.

This summer marks the third year since the family-owned company’s newest flavor debuted.

The drink is a blend of citrus orange and vanilla cream combined with the 95-year-old family recipe of Ale-8-One, that brings a nostalgic taste of Dreamsicle, in liquid form, to your taste buds.

For a lot of people, Dreamsicles symbolize summer, so it’s extremely relatable for Ale-8 to base a drink off a product and season that are both so highly regarded among the public.

The drink is usually released to the public around the end of May or the early parts of June and is always highly anticipated.

According to DeAnne Elmore, corporate communications manager at Ale-8-One, this year it will be released to the public in stores around June 7 and on fountains at Clark’s Pump N Shop on Main Street beginning the week of May 24.

This past Friday, I was fortunate enough to tour the Ale-8-One Bottling Company on the first day of production of the citrus drink.

As the bottles kept filling, my excitement kept growing thinking about the flavorful drink.

At the end of the tour, I was lucky enough to snag one of the first Orange Cream Ale-8’s provided to the public this year, and to say it was refreshing is a huge understatement.

It left a lasting impression on my taste buds that has me counting down the days ’til it’s in stores, and I can go stock up.

Ale-8 knows exactly what it is doing with this spectacular seasonal product.

It gives us that feeling of summer and all the happiness that surrounds the season all rolled into one 12-ounce bottle.

I can say without a doubt I am hooked on this outstanding beverage, and I am willing to bet I’m not alone.

The drink is sold in limited quantities, while supplies last.

Get your first taste at Clark’s Pump N Shop around Memorial Day weekend and in retail stores June 7, so you, too, can enjoy a sip of summer.

Editor’s Note: Ale-8-One is NOT open to the public, but as a member of the press, Sawyer was permitted access to tour the first production.

D. Boon killed an elk? Fort Boonesborough Foundation member researches carving, antler

By Winchester Sun

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Published 11:53 am Friday, May 14, 2021

BY TAYLOR SIX

Richmond Register

For decades, generations of the Langston family took an odd heirloom to their school’s show and tell days.

Andra Gyor recalled the days she, and her now adult son, Langston, both proudly displayed before their peers what appeared to be a large horn, or antler, with an interesting inscription: “D BOON 1778.”

Years ago, the antler was discovered by a distant family relative in a tributary near Hinkston Creek in Bourbon County.

The family kept the elk antler and thought the inscription was carved by famous Kentucky frontiersman Daniel Boone — who is known to have traveled Hinkston Creek many times.

In 2017, Janice Langston and her daughter, Andra, donated the elk antler to friends George and Elizabeth Chalfant of the Fort Boonesborough Foundation to see if they could find out more information about their unique family heirloom.

On Saturday, after working “untold hours” and nearly three years on researching the antler and its origin, members of the Langston family, the Chalfants, and members of the foundation gathered at Fort Boonesborough to celebrate the unveiling of the exhibit that features the antler.

“This is a project that just kind of started,” Elizabeth Chalfant said.

She said she was working one day for her other business and happened to tell Janice Langston about her work at Boonesborough.

“She told me that next time we come down, she has a horn she wants us to look at,” Elizabeth Chalfant recalled. “Working with Fort Boonesborough, when you hear ‘a horn,’ you think of a powder horn.”

When she and George met with the Langstons weeks later, Elizabeth Chalfant said her husband pulled the horn out of a large black garbage bag and exclaimed, “This is an antler! And look what it has carved on it.”

“That is where it all started,” Elizabeth Chalfant said with a laugh. “We thought, ‘This is really going to be good.’”

Once they received the donation in August 2017, both Chalfants said the antler became a huge part of their life — working closely with the foundation to learn as much as possible about the artifact.

Along with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, George Chalfant was able to obtain a grant to help carbon date the antler.

The carbon dating data revealed the antler belonged to an 18th century extinct subspecies of elk of that time period, which corresponded with the date on the carving.

Although elk have been reintroduced to Kentucky in recent years, they are of a different subspecies than the 18th century elk which is now extinct.

“There is no other artifact in Kentucky like this, even without the carving,” George Chalfant said.

However, the curious carving was the reason the family held onto the bone, and kept it for all the years they did — ultimately preserving it for thousands to see.

“It is amazing how an old bone found on the creek has made it this far,” George Chalfant said on Saturday. “Without the carving, the antler may have just been lost. But with it, the family kept this.”

Although Daniel Boone is said to have been in the Hinkston Creek area a lot in his travels, and would have been around that time, experts said it would be impossible to confirm if Boone did in fact carve the etching into the bone.

Despite the mystery of who actually killed the elk and carved D Boon into the piece, the antler and a replica of it are now located at Fort Boonesborough State Park for the public to view.

After investing so much research into the antler and Kentucky elk, George Chalfant also authored a publication, “The Historic Elk Antler,” available at the 18th Century Transylvania Store where the original antler is located.

“The hours are untold,” Elizabeth Chalfant said of the research into the antler. “The investigating, looking up things, talking to people, and hours at the computer, are untold. But it was worth every minute.”

For more information about Fort Boonesborough State Park, visit parks.ky.gov/richmond/parks/historic/fort-boonesborough-state-park.

Kentucky State University to kick off 135th anniversary celebration with giving campaign, new partnership with Ale-8-One

NEWS PROVIDED BYHGPR Inc.May 12, 2021, 15:49 GMTSHARE THIS ARTICLE

WINCHESTER, KENTUCKY, UNITED STATES, May 12, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — After navigating the effects of a global pandemic for the last year to deliver access to education, Kentucky State University has more reasons than ever to celebrate its 135th anniversary as an institution of higher education.

Part of the 135th anniversary celebration is a new partnership with the iconic Kentucky soda brand, Ale-8-One Bottling Company. Ale-8-One, local producer of Kentucky’s original ginger and citrus soft drink sold in their signature green glass bottles, is also celebrating its 95th anniversary this year. Kentucky State and Ale-8-One will highlight the partnership with a series of collaborations throughout the year.

Through the partnership, a commemorative 135th anniversary Ale-8-One label will be released exclusively to Kentucky State to honor this historic moment. The partnership also includes expanding opportunities and support for Kentucky State University students through internships and scholarships, and an Ale-8-One presence on campus. Finally, Ale-8-One is making its first scholarship donation to the Together Thorobreds campaign and is encouraging others to do so as well.

“This milestone recognition represents a natural partnership between Ale-8-One and Kentucky State. Our shared commitment to agriculture, historic relevance, and of course, our shared colors, brings forth a commonality deserving celebration. We look forward to forming a substantive relationship with the Kentucky State community and strengthening our presence on campus,” said Chris Doyle, marketing director for Ale-8-One.

With a goal of raising more than $3.5 million, Kentucky State will launch its Together Thorobreds 135th Anniversary Giving Campaign. To benefit Kentucky State’s efforts to advance its mission to support the institution’s four pillars of success — academics, access, athletics and agriculture — gifts representing 1886, the University’s founding year, will be requested from constituents through a monthly giving day challenge, highlighting campaign fundraising champions on the 18th day of every month. Gifts ranging from $18 to $1886 are encouraged for this campaign.

The Together Thorobreds campaign also provides constituents with the opportunity to join the Thorobred Annual Giving Society. Members may join the President’s Society with gifts of $5,000 or above, the Onward and Upward Society with gifts ranging from $3,000 to $4,999, the 1886 Society with gifts ranging from $500 to $2,999 or the Green and Gold Society with gifts under $500. Inaugural members will receive an exclusive 135th anniversary pin and other gifts by designated society level.

The campaign goal is to generate philanthropic support for tuition assistance and to establish eight endowed student scholarship for $18,886.

Visit kysu.edu/give to participate in the Together Thorobreds 135th Anniversary Giving Campaign. For more information on 135 years of excellence, visit kysu.edu/togetherthorobreds135.

Niki Dec
HGPR Inc.
+1 310-859-8870
[email protected]

D. Boon kilt an elk? Fort Boonesborough Foundation member researches carving, antler

Fort Boonesborough Foundation member researches carving, antler

Taylor Six [email protected]

For decades, generations of the Langston Family took an odd heirloom to their school’s show and tell days.

Andra Gyor recalled the days she, and her now adult son, Langston, both proudly displayed before their peers what appeared to be a large horn, or antler, with an interesting inscription:

“D BOON(e) 1778.”

Years ago, the antler was discovered by a distant family relative in a tributary near Hinkston Creek in Bourbon County.

The family kept the elk antler and thought the inscription was carved by famous Kentucky frontiersman Daniel Boone — who is known to have travelled the Hickston Creek many times.

In 2017, Janice Langston and her daughter Andra donated the elk antler to friends, George and Elizabeth Chalfant of the Fort Boonesborough Foundation (FBF), to see if they could find out more information about their unique family heirloom.

On Saturday, after working “untold hours” and nearly three years on researching the antler and its origin, members of the Langston family, the Chalfants, and members of the FBF gathered at the Fort Boonesborough to celebrate the unveiling of the exhibit which features the antler.

“This is a project that just kind of started,” Elizabeth Chalfant explained.

She said she was working one day for her other business and happened to tell Janice Langston about her work at Boonesborough.

“She told me that next time we come down, she has a horn she wants us to look at,” Elizabeth Chalfant recalled. “Working with Fort Boonesborough, when you hear a horn, you think of a powder horn.”

When she and her husband George Chalfant met with the Langstons weeks later, Elizabeth Chalfant said her husband pulled the horn out of a large black garbage bag and exclaimed, “This is an antler! And look what it has carved on it.”

“That is where it all started,” Elizabeth Chalfant said with a laugh. “We thought, ‘This is really going to be good.’”

Once they received the donation in August of 2017, both Chalfants said the antler became a huge part of their life — working closely with the foundation to learn as much as possible about the artifact.

Along with the Rocky Mountain Elk Foundation, George Chalfant was able to obtain a grant to help carbon date the antler.

The carbon dating data revealed the antler belonged to an 18th century extinct subspecies of elk of that time period, which corresponded with the date on the carving.

Although elk have been reintroduced to Kentucky in recent years, they are of a different subspecies than the 18th century elk which is now extinct.

“There is no other artifact in Kentucky like this, even without the carving,” George Chalfant said.

However, the curious carving was the reason the family held onto the bone, and kept it for all the years they did — ultimately preserving it for thousands to see.

“It is amazing how an old bone found on the creek has made it this far,” George Chalfant said on Saturday. “Without the carving, the antler may have just been lost. But with it, the family kept this.”

Although Daniel Boone is said to have been in the Hinkston Creek area a lot in his travels, and would have been around that time, experts said it would be impossible to confirm if Boone did in fact carve the etching into the bone.

Despite the mystery of who actually killed the elk and carved D Boon into the piece, the antler and a replica of it are now located at Fort Boonesborough State Park for the public to view.

After investing so much research into the antler and Kentucky elk, George Chalfant also authored a publication, “The Historic Elk Antler,” available at the 18th Century Transylvania Store where the original antler is located.

“The hours are untold,” Elizabeth Chalfant said of the research into the antler. “The investigating, looking up things, talking to people, and hours at the computer, are untold. But it was worth every minute.”

Fore more information about the Fort Boonesborough State Park visit parks.ky.gov/richmond/parks/historic/fort-boonesborough-state-park.

Downtown making progress despite pandemic; city earns 2021 Main Street accreditation

By Randy Patrick

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Published 3:46 pm Monday, April 12, 2021

Things are looking up for downtown Winchester after a year of COVID-19 setbacks.

Main Street Winchester has received a certificate of accreditation as a 2021 Kentucky Main Street Program from the Kentucky Heritage Council, and on Monday, the city was interviewing candidates for a full-time Main Street director.

Rachael Boyd, who has been the part-time interim director for the past three months and is one of the candidates for the position, said Monday that among the benefits accreditation will bring is that it will help the program in applying for grants.

Boyd, who moved to Winchester from Louisiana with her husband in 2018, said that the program has had a master plan since 2015 that was funded by the Clark County Community Foundation and the city and county governments. That plan includes creating a downtown reinvestment fund and tax increment financing district and a facades grant program as well as enhanced marketing of downtown.

“I think what you’re seeing is that there was a refocus,” Boyd said, when improvements to the downtown streetscape were mentioned in conversation.

Despite the coronavirus pandemic and the closure of some downtown businesses, there are signs of improvement. The city has invested in handicapped-accessible sidewalks and ramps on South Main Street and Cleveland Avenue in recent months. The McEldowney Building is undergoing a major rehabilitation and several other buildings are being restored. An outdoor events venue has been created on the east side of North Main Street, and until COVID closed the theater, the Leeds Center for the Arts was planning a major expansion of its building, including dressing rooms for the actors, room for set design and a rear entrance. And the Winchester Farmers Market on Depot Street, with its restored brick pavement, has plans for a covered pavilion for the vendors. New restaurants have opened downtown, including Loma’s in the Winchester Opera House and La Trattoria on North Main. Wildcat Willy’s, a moonshine distillery and restaurant, will be reopening soon on Broadway, and Abettor Brewing Company is moving into a new location adjacent to the Farmers Market.

During the city Board of Commissioners meeting last week, city officials approved funding for $1,000 facade grants for two downtown businesses that are being renovated, at 53/55 S. Main St. and 2 S. Main St. The one at 53/55 also recently received funding for interior improvements to convert the upper part of the building into residential space.

In recent years, several of the downtown buildings have renovated their upper floors to be apartments, which is one of the goals of the master plan.

Boyd said Main Street Winchester is also hoping to bring back some of the events that were shut down last year because of the virus, including Rock the Block and possibly the Beer Cheese Festival, but with “a festival of that magnitude,” she said, it would take some planning and coordination with the Health Department to be able to do those events in ways that involve less risk.

“At the end of the day, we’re just trying to keep people safe,” she said.

On Monday, Kitty Dougoud, the state Main Street coordinator, said Winchester’s Main Street program, formerly known as Winchester First, has received accreditation from the state and national programs for many years.

Craig Potts, executive director of the Kentucky Heritage Council, said the council’s Kentucky Main Street Program, established in 1979, is the oldest program of its kind in the country, and Winchester’s is one of the oldest in the state. In fact, if you look closely at the state program’s logo, you’ll notice the buildings depicted in the drawing are of the “high side” of Main Street in Winchester, and “we are very proud of that image,” Potts said, Winchester “should be too.”

The high side of Main Street is a multi-block National Historic District.

“Participation as an accredited Main Street Program provides many benefits, including training and networking opportunities, access to design assistance from architects at the Kentucky Heritage Council, and eligibility to apply for support through the National Main Street Center,” Potts said.

“Main Street is largely a grass roots program based on a registered four-point approach placing high emphasis on engagement with local leaders, businesses, developers, volunteers and other stakeholders,” he said. “No Main Street Program is the same because no Main Street community is the same, but the requirement to consistently apply the national and state program requirements gives communities like Winchester a proven pathway to incremental, and ultimately successful, downtown revitalization.”

“Downtown is the heart of every community and we are judged by how well we take care of those places,” Dougoud said.

Fort Boonesborough State Park Closes Campground to Repair Flood Damage

BY CRYSTAL SICARD KENTUCKYUPDATED 6:30 PM ET APR. 02, 2021 PUBLISHED 5:30 PM ET APR. 02, 2021

RICHMOND, Ky.- With Spring weather around the corner, the outdoor activities becomes more popular. Unfortunately this year, those outdoor activities will not include the campgrounds at Fort Boonesborough State Park.

Will Adams, Deputy Commissioner of Kentucky Department of Parks says being so close to the Kentucky River can be a blessing and a curse. When floodwaters came through the area, Adams says many things got destroyed. 

“And unfortunately all of the electrical pedestals that those campers hook up to were destroyed by the floodwaters. So those will all have to be replaced. On our two bathhouses, one had about six feet of water and the other quite a bit more. So those are going to have to be completely renovated,” Adams said.

Kentucky State Parks says Fort Boonesborough State Park will be closed until early August. Typically during the April and July months,

Adams says they see around 10,000-11,000 campers on their campgrounds.Adams says during these next few months, crews will be taking the time to repair and hopefully improve their electrical systems and structures.

“We are going to go back in with a more resilient design that has a removable core to it, so that when the floodwaters come up again because we know with climate change and just proximity to the river, this is not going to be an isolated incident. In the future we’ll be able to just pull those cords out as the waters rise without damaging the sensitive electronics,” Adams said.

Crews are still working on evaluating the amount of damage on the campgrounds, but Adams says the park will reopen next Wednesday, April 7, resuming their regular hours. As of right now, the swimming pool will most likely stay closed for the season, and the campgrounds are planning to reopen August 1.

Kentucky’s Ale-8-One Releases New Variety Packs

NEWS PROVIDED BYHGPink PRApril 01, 2021, 18:19 GMT

Historic Soda Brand Brings Trifecta of Flavors to Ten New States for Derby

In the spirit of the derby season and Kentucky’s racing traditions, the themed variety pack offers a touch of the Bluegrass to consumers in other states.”— Chris Doyle, Ale-8-One Marketing Director

WINCHESTER, KENTUCKY, UNITED STATES, April 1, 2021 /EINPresswire.com/ — Ale-8-One Bottling Company, celebrating 95 years this year, launches racing themed variety pack just in time for derby season. The limited edition 12-pack will showcase the Company’s famous ginger-flavored Heritage Ale-8, Cherry Ale-8, and the seasonal Orange Cream Ale-8. Using the secret family recipe first crafted nearly 100 years ago, all three products are lightly carbonated, made with real sugar and contain only 120-calories, fewer than most soft drinks in the market. This April 1st launch is exclusive to Kroger and will be featured in 375 Kroger locations across ten states including major metro areas in Atlanta, Houston, Nashville, and the Mid-Atlantic.

About Ale-8-One
Ale-8-One Bottling Company was founded in 1902 by G.L. Wainscott in Winchester, Kentucky, and remains the oldest, privately held bottler in the United States still owned and operated by the founding family. Ale-8-One soft drink has been bottled in green glass in Winchester since 1926. The only soft drink invented in Kentucky still in existence, Ale-8’s proprietary blend is flavored with ginger and citrus and contains less carbonation and fewer calories than conventional sodas. The company’s founder and inventor, G.L. Wainscott developed the recipe, and to this day, his great-great-nephew, Fielding Rogers, personally blends every batch of Ale-8. Ale-8 is widely available in Kentucky, available nationwide online, available in Kroger stores throughout the Southeast, and can be found at most Cracker Barrel Old Country Stores and Fresh Market.

For those interested in learning more about Ale-8-One and Ale-8-One products:
Visit our website www.ale8one.com and follow us on InstagramFacebook, and Twitter.

Niki Dec
HGPR Inc.
[email protected]

KSU celebrates its 135th anniversary, Ale8 joins as partner

By Leah Caudill– March 24, 2021

FRANKFORT, Ky. (WTVQ) – After navigating the effects of a global pandemic for the last year to deliver access to education, Kentucky State University has more reasons than ever to celebrate its 135th anniversary as an institution of higher education.

Part of the 135th anniversary celebration is a new partnership with the iconic Kentucky soda brand, Ale-8-One Bottling Company.

Ale-8-One, local producer of Kentucky’s original ginger and citrus soft drink sold in their signature green glass bottles, is also celebrating its 95th anniversary this year. Kentucky State and Ale-8-One will highlight the partnership with a series of collaborations throughout the year.

Through the partnership, a commemorative 135th anniversary Ale-8-One label will be released exclusively to Kentucky State to honor this historic moment. The partnership also includes expanding opportunities and support for Kentucky State University students through internships and scholarships, and an Ale-8-One presence on campus.

Finally, Ale-8-One is making its first scholarship donation to the Together Thorobreds campaign and is encouraging others to do so as well.

With a goal of raising more than $3.5 million, Kentucky State will launch its Together Thorobreds 135th Anniversary Giving Campaign. To benefit Kentucky State’s efforts to advance its mission to support the institution’s four pillars of success — academics, access, athletics and agriculture — gifts representing 1886, the University’s founding year, will be requested from constituents through a monthly giving day challenge, highlighting campaign fundraising champions on the 18th day of every month. Gifts ranging from $18 to $1886 are encouraged for this campaign.

The Together Thorobreds campaign also provides constituents with the opportunity to join the Thorobred Annual Giving Society. Members may join the President’s Society with gifts of $5,000 or above, the Onward and Upward Society with gifts ranging from $3,000 to $4,999, the 1886 Society with gifts ranging from $500 to $2,999 or the Green and Gold Society with gifts under $500. Inaugural members will receive an exclusive 135th anniversary pin and other gifts by designated society level.

The campaign goal is to generate philanthropic support for tuition assistance and to establish eight endowed student scholarship for $18,886.

Visit kysu.edu/give to participate in the Together Thorobreds 135th Anniversary Giving Campaign. For more information on 135 years of excellence, visit www.kysu.edu/togetherthorobreds135.

Spotlight on Winchester: Leeds eager to light up the stage again

WINCHESTER, Ky. (LEX 18) — On Main Street in downtown Winchester, the flashing lights and marquee of Leeds Theatre have drawn people in since the 1920s.

“The Leeds Theatre opened in 1925 as a single screen movie theatre,” theatre volunteer Ellie Miller said.

Decades passed and the theatre eventually closed and sat in despair until the year 1990s when the Winchester council for the arts stepped in.

“They actually raised over a million dollars to but the building and renovate it into the arts center that you see here today,” Miller said.

Now known as the Leeds Center for the Arts, it underwent another renovation in 2017.

“We like to refer to Leeds as the jewel of Main Street,” Miller said. “You know, there is so much history here and I think this place has meant so much to so many people over the years.”

In a typical year, the theatre would put on a big Summer musical, a couple children’s musicals, other plays and host performers, concerts and events. But for a year now, nothing.

“This unprecedented year, I think has brought our community closer together and we are so grateful for the amount of support we have received,” Miller said.

Until the stage lights are shining again and the 410 seats fill up with an audience, the community that has been built by the Leeds Theatre won’t be rattled.

“Artists are resilient and I think we are at the cusp of getting ready to come back and get into it,” Miller said. “And I think it will be better than ever.”

Watch here!